Soft Matter ODES-lab: Teaching

Courses, Teaching Assistants, Textbooks

University of Illinois at Chicago (11.12-current)

CHE 410: Transport Phenomena 

Course Description: Continuum theory of momentum, energy, and mass transfer. Viscous behavior of fluids. Laminar and turbulent flow. Thermal conduction and convection, diffusion and coupled operations.

Graduate course (4 credits); UG (3 credits, enroll after consulting with the instructor). (Graduate, Required Course)
Textbook: Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition by William M. Deen. Oxford University Press (2011) to be supplemented by lecture notes, assignments and extra reading material.
Supplementary texts
Advanced Transport Phenomena: Fluid Mechanics and Convective Transport Processes by L. Gary Leal, Cambridge University Press, (2010). (Leal)
Electrochemical Systems, 3rd edition by J. Newman and K. E. Thomas-Alyea, John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2004) (Newman)
Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition by R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot. John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2006) (BSL)
Micro- and Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics: Transport in Microfluidic Devices by Brian J. Kirby, Cambridge University Press (2009) (Kirby)
An Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and An Introduction of Heat and Mass Transfer by Stanley Middleman, John Wiley & Sons, Inc (1998)  (Middleman)
A Modern Course in Transport Phenomena by D. C. Venerus and H. C. Öttinger, In preparation. (Venerus-Öttinger)
Physical Hydrodynamics by E. Guyon, J. Hulin, L. Petit and C. D. Mitescu, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford (2012). (GHPM)
Fluid Mechanics by L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, 2nd edition, Butterworth-Heinemann (1987). (Landau-Lifshitz)
Physiochemical Hydrodynamics: An Introduction by Ronald F. Probstein, 2nd edition, Wiley Interscience, (2003). (Probstein)
Incompressible Flow by Ronald N. Panton, 4th edition, Wiley Interscience, (2013) (Panton)

Fall 2018, Students enrolled = 19, TA: Chenxian Xu
Fall 2017, Students enrolled = 32, TA: Songwei Che
Fall 2016, Students enrolled = 28 TA: Prerana Rathore
Fall 2015, Students enrolled = 22

Course Overview: List of Topics (2017)

CourseOverview_ CHE410_ListofTopics_2018

CHE 494: Fizzics and Interfacial Phenomena

Offered in Spring 2018, Spring 2016 & Fall 2013

Course description: Fizzics in daily life: Soap bubbles, soda pop, emulsions, foams, fog, dew, beer froth, shaving foam, whipped cream & detergents. “Ben Franklin stilled the waves” & historical perspective. Surface tension & Adsorption Kinetics; Interfacial rheology: concepts & techniques. Flows & instabilities induced by capillarity.  Foam drainage. Viscoelastic interfaces. Biological Interfaces: Lipids & vesicles, proteins at interfaces. Thermodynamics of interfaces, Gibbs’ adsorption equation. Nucleation. Capillary condensation. Theories of Rain. Charged interfaces. Colloidal stability. DLVO theory. Monolayers & Langmuir-Blodgett films. Wetting & spreading.  Imaging & spectroscopy of interfaces. Examples from medicine, insect world, pharmaceuticals, enhanced oil recovery, printing & coating processes., food industry and cosmetics. 

Course Overview: List of Topics (2016)

CHE 312: Transport Phenomena II (Heat and Mass Transfer)

 Spring 2017, Students enrolled = 80, TAs: Paria and Maryam

Course description: Heat and mass transport phenomena. Heat conduction, convection and radiation. Heat exchanger design. Diffusion. Mass transfer coefficients.

Textbook: Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition by R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot. John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2006) to be supplemented by lecture notes, assignments and extra reading material. Secondary textbook: An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer: Principles of Analysis and Design by Stanley Middleman, John Wiley & Sons Inc (1998) Detailed course website is hosted on blackboard.uic.edu: Only accessible to students enrolled in the class.

Previous offerings

Spring 2016, Students enrolled = 76 TAs: Jelena Dinic and Nikhila Parsi Spring 2015, Students enrolled = 71 TA: Yiran Zhang (graders Norman Moreno, Nallely Jimenez & Su Huang) Spring 2014, Students enrolled = 56 TA: Yiran Zhang (assisted by Subinuer Yilixiati) Spring 2013, Students enrolled = 46 TA: Yiran Zhang

CHE 301: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

 

Fall 2014, Student enrolled = 75 (Juniors)

Course Description: Review of classical engineering thermodynamics. Multicomponent systems & multicomponent phase equilibria. Equilibrium in chemically reacting systems, heterogeneous equilibrium, Gibbs phase rule, and electrochemical processes. Prerequisite(s): CHE 201 and CHE 205.

Teaching Assistant: Paola Leon-Plata (assisted by Su Huang and Nallely Jimenez)

Required Textbook: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics by Smith, Van Ness and Abbott (7th ed., McGraw Hill). NOTE: An ebook with ISBN 9781308274119 is recommended (contains selected chapters from the text).

Also recommended:Chemical, Biochemical and Engineering Thermodynamics by Stanley Sandler (Wiley)

Detailed course website is hosted on blackboard.uic.edu: Only accessible to students enrolled in the class.

CHE 392: Undergraduate Research

Students enrolled so far = 13

 

Summer 2013 (1), Fall 2013 (2), Spring 2014 (5), Summer 2014 (1), Fall 2014 (2) , Spring 2015 (3).

University of Chicago, Hyde Park, Chicago IL (Fall 2017)

MENG36300: Transport Phenomena

(Graduate, Core Course: Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME))

Autumn 2017, Students enrolled = 32, TA: Phil Rauscher, IME, University of Chicago.

Course Description: Continuum theory of momentum, energy, and mass transfer. Viscous behavior of fluids. Laminar and turbulent flow. Thermal conduction and convection, diffusion and coupled operations.

Textbook: Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition by William M. Deen. Oxford University Press (2011) to be supplemented by lecture notes, assignments and extra reading material.
Supplementary texts
Advanced Transport Phenomena: Fluid Mechanics and Convective Transport Processes by L. Gary Leal, Cambridge University Press, (2010). (Leal)
Electrochemical Systems, 3rd edition by J. Newman and K. E. Thomas-Alyea, John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2004) (Newman)
Transport Phenomena, Revised 2nd Edition by R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot. John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2006) (BSL)
Micro- and Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics: Transport in Microfluidic Devices by Brian J. Kirby, Cambridge University Press (2009) (Kirby)
An Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and An Introduction of Heat and Mass Transfer by Stanley Middleman, John Wiley & Sons, Inc (1998)  (Middleman)
A Modern Course in Transport Phenomena by D. C. Venerus and H. C. Öttinger, In preparation. (Venerus-Öttinger)
Physical Hydrodynamics by E. Guyon, J. Hulin, L. Petit and C. D. Mitescu, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford (2012). (GHPM)
Fluid Mechanics by L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, 2nd edition, Butterworth-Heinemann (1987). (Landau-Lifshitz)
Physiochemical Hydrodynamics: An Introduction by Ronald F. Probstein, 2nd edition, Wiley Interscience, (2003). (Probstein)
Incompressible Flow by Ronald N. Panton, 4th edition, Wiley Interscience, (2013) (Panton)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Spring 2012)

10.531/2.341 Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (co-taught with Gareth H. McKinley*)

Course goal: The aim of the course is to provide a basic foundation in the fluid mechanics of structurally complex materials. It is hoped to provide an understanding of the physics underlying the constitutive equations for these materials as well as an appreciation for the approximations needed in obtaining tractable equations (from both a continuum and a micromechanical viewpoint) plus useful solutions to typical flow problems. *I replaced sections taught by Bob Armstrong on Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, with molecular viscoelasticity and polymer physics sections (based on Polymer Physics text by Rubinstein and Colby); Gareth taught continuum mechanics based models. Chris Macosko featured as guest lecturer for one week.

Text: The primary text for the course is R.B. Bird, R.C. Armstrong, and O. Hassager, Dynamics of Polymeric Liquids, Vol. 1. Fluid Mechanics, Wiley, New York (1987), Second Edition.

Other useful references include:

  1. Rubinstein, R. Colby, Polymer Physics Oxford Univ Press (2000). More molecularly-focused on chain dynamics, scaling etc. Less on flow problems
  2. C.W. Macosko, Rheology: Principles, Measurements, and Applications, VCH/Wiley, New York (1994).
  3. R.B. Bird, R.C. Armstrong, and O. Hassager, Dynamics of Polymeric Liquids, Vol. 2. Kinetic Theory, Wiley, New York (1987), Second Edition.
  4. R.G. Larson, Constitutive Equations for Polymer Melts and Solutions, Butterworths, Boston (1988).
  5. R.G. Larson, The Structure and Rheology of Complex Fluids, Topics in Chemical Engineering, Oxford University Press, New York, 1999.
  6. Faith Morrison, Understanding Rheology, Oxford Univ. Press. 2003.
  7. M. Doi and S.F. Edwards The Theory of Polymer Dynamics, OUP, Oxford, 1986.
  8. Graessley, W. W. Polymeric Liquids & Networks; Dynamics and Rheology, Garland Scientific (2008)
  9. R.I. Tanner, Engineering Rheology, Second Edition, Oxford University Press (2000).
  10. Walters, Rheometry, Halsted, London (1975).
  11. Probstein, R.F., Physicochemical Hydrodynamics: An Introduction, Second Edition, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1994.
  12. J.D. Ferry, Viscoelasticity of Polymers, Wiley, New York (1980), Third Edition.